Diodoros su Palate Press – Febbraio 2015

Diodoros: Wine Among the Ruins di Michelle Locke

“On a day that trembles between sunshine and showers, shafts of early morning sun slice through the clouds to light up the vineyard of Nero d’Avola grapes growing in this quiet corner of Sicily.

It’s not a particularly unusual sight. Nero d’Avola is Sicily’s great red grape, notable for producing rich, silky wines and you typically find it growing all over the region. Except this is no typical vineyard. These grapes are planted on the archeological site of the Valley of the Temples, part of a project reviving a tradition more than two millennia old.

The wine, known as Diodoros, is being made by the CVA Canicatti coöp, one of my hosts on this trip to Italy, in collaboration with park authorities who are aiming to resurrect the valley’s ancient crops as a way to raise money and expand the park’s audience by appealing to agri-tourists as well as the historically minded. They’re also selling a Diodoros olive oil harvested from the park’s thousands of olive trees, some hundreds of years old.”

Clicca sul titolo per leggere  l’articolo di Michelle Locke pubblicato su Palate Press “Diodoros: Wine Among the Ruins”

Diodoros: Wine Among the Ruins by Michelle Locke

“On a day that trembles between sunshine and showers, shafts of early morning sun slice through the clouds to light up the vineyard of Nero d’Avola grapes growing in this quiet corner of Sicily.

It’s not a particularly unusual sight. Nero d’Avola is Sicily’s great red grape, notable for producing rich, silky wines and you typically find it growing all over the region. Except this is no typical vineyard. These grapes are planted on the archeological site of the Valley of the Temples, part of a project reviving a tradition more than two millennia old.

The wine, known as Diodoros, is being made by the CVA Canicatti coöp, one of my hosts on this trip to Italy, in collaboration with park authorities who are aiming to resurrect the valley’s ancient crops as a way to raise money and expand the park’s audience by appealing to agri-tourists as well as the historically minded. They’re also selling a Diodoros olive oil harvested from the park’s thousands of olive trees, some hundreds of years old.”

Click on the link  to read article “Diodoros: Wine Among the Ruins” on Palate Press